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>>> glad to have you with us on this edition of "newsline." it's tuesday, november 13th. i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. japan's prime minister is getting caught up in his own words. yoshihiko noda suggested a few months ago he would call an election. members of the opposition are putting more and more pressure on him to follow through. but he faces divisions within his democratic party. noda said during the summer that he would call an election in his words some time soon. he says he stands by his promise. >> translator: i am responsible for my own words, and i take their weight very seriously. >> noda told his party's secretary general on sunday that he's thinking of dissolving the lower house by the end of the year. noda set three conditions for calling the elections including passing a debt financing bill. lawmakers expect to enact the legislation soon. kosishi says dissolving the diet would create a political vacuum. >>> we may soon see more american oil tycoons. yu yu yu yu yuko fukushima joins us now. >> we're hearing that the united states will become the world's
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." the two leading candidates fighting to be u.s. president hardly have time to sleep or eat as they dart from state to state trying to solidify their support. the latest poll ahead of tuesday's vote suggests barack obama and his republican challenger mitt romney are almost tied. obama has 49% support. romney has 48%. the candidates dashed through key swing states over the weekend, including new hampshire. they are making their final arguments to voters. both campaigns are trying to lock in crucial electoral college votes. >> you know that i know what real change looks like, because i fought for it alongside you. i've got the scars to prove it. i've got the gray hair to show for it. >> romney hopscotched between the swing states of new hampshire, iowa, colorado and ohio. >> the question of this election comes down to this, you want four more years like the last four years or do you want real change? >> romney is also focusing on wisconsin, one toss-up state where obama is said to have a lead. and he is running more tv ads in pennsylvania, mich
the disputes should not be internationalized, an indirect reference to the united states. u.s. president barack obama and chinese premier wen jiabao held bilateral talks before the summit began on tuesday. they both seek closer ties with southeast asian countries as part of their competing regional strategies. >> it's important that our two countries cooperate to build a more secure and prosperous future for the asia-pacific region and for the world. >> despite their friendly words, both sides took their differences with them to the east asia summit. obama called on the country's concern to quickly draw up the code of conduct. one indirectly said the united states should not be involved, stating that the disputes should not be internationalized. now, obama's trip to asia is a sign that america's so-called pivot to asia strategy remains unchanged after his re-election. his visit to myanmar was criticized by some observers. they say it was premature. obama went ahead anyway, a signal of his desire to increase u.s. influence in southeast asia and keep china's ambitions in check. nhk world's matthe
in the near future. he used the word "soon," and noda has been trying to find a suitable time to dissolve the diet. but the election can take place next month at the earliest. but as the polls suggest, this may not be a favorable time for noda or his party. he knows that an election held now could lead to a dramatic drop in the number of lawmakers sitting alongside him. but there is no guarantee, on the other hand, that the outlook will improve, even if he postpones the vote. sooner or later noda will have to make that decision. >>> china's hu jintao has overseen an economy that's expanded year after year during his ten years as president. but many rural chinese have missed out. they've watched their neighbors get wealthier and wealthier. that's left many seething with resentment. and some are trying to find solace in their faith. nhk world's michitaka yamaka explains. >> reporter: about 300 people live in this village on the yellow river in gansu province. more than two-thirds of the residents work the ground. that includes this man. he lives with his wife. their life is close so self-su
the seat allocation breaks down among the parties in the election. >>> u.s. government officials always closely monitor elections in japan. one spoke to nhk, saying they believe there's possibility that the liberal democratic party could regain power. >>> meanwhile, japan's biggest neighbor has a demand for the next government. >> translator: what's urgently needed is that japan should take appropriate action to resolve existing problems and rebuild relations with china. >> analysts say chinese officials are waiting to see how the result of the election will affect ties between the countries. relations have been strained since the end of the summer when a long-standing dispute over islands in the east china sea flared up again. >>> the fate of some major economic and energy policies planned under the noda administration is now up in the air following the dissolution of the lower house. the diet won't be able to consider these policies until after a new administration is sworn in following the general election. noda's government decided last month to spend nearly $5 billion trying to get
ishihara to lift us out of this slump. >> translator: he performed well as a tokyo governor, so i have high hopes for him. >> reporter: but ishihara's power base is uncertain. the new party has only five members, all from the former sunrise party of japan. so ishihara has already started seeking collaboration with the japan restoration party. whether ishihara can really become the major third power depends on if we can achieve the tie-ups with the other parties. ishihara also needs to appeal to many floating voters because they are one of the major determinants of the shift of power in the next general election. mitsuko nishikawa, nhk world, tokyo. >>> the most powerful people in china are now busy deciding the country's future. communist party members have been in beijing since thursday at their national congress. attendants are excited about the hottest topic on the table -- who will make up china's next generation of leaders. party officials will reportedly unveil the new lineup on thursday. but a human rights campaigner says the only way china can move forward is to move towards democra
is in beijing covering all of this for us. >> people in china and abroad spent a lot of time speculating about this transition of power. but with just hours to go, few in this country of 1.3 billion know exactly what their leadership will look like when they wake up in the morning. that's being worked out behind closed doors. before those negotiations began, communist party members ended the meeting they hold every five years. about 2300 delegates gathered in the great hall of the people in beijing. the party's outgoing general secretary president hu jintao delivered his closing address. >> translator: all party members should unite under the party character hold high the great banner of socialism. >> president hu has managed to carve out a place alongside the communist party's past leaders. members of the congress agree to incorporate a concept he supports into party policy. it's known as the scientific outlook on development and advocates growth that takes into account social and environmental needs. delegates also voted to pick the roughly 200 members who will sit on the party's central com
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7